Actiq is a formulation of fentanyl citrate that is in the form of a ‘lollipop’ that is most effective when consumed in 15 minutes. The main ingredient, fentanyl citrate, is intended to be used as a painkiller for people who have trouble swallowing, and this synthetic opiate can be 80-times to 100-times more powerful than morphine. Having a berry flavored taste, the lollipop painkiller comes in gray, blue, orange, purple, green, and burgundy plastic handles to indicate the different dosages.

Though created to help cancer patients and others suffering from severe pain, there are issues associated with this drug. This highly addictive lollipop has been linked to dozens of deaths across the United States. Although the FDA approved it in 1998 for cancer patients, more than 80 percent of lollipop users don't have cancer.

Because it contains a large amount of sugar and flavoring, people who consume several lollipops a day often experience weight gain and tooth decay. Other side effects may include hot flashes, dizziness, constipation and rash. It has addictive qualities similar to those of heroin.

The fact that the drug company behind Actiq actively encouraged doctors to prescribe this powerful drug for off-label use means that they may be held responsible for the resulting serious side effects.

If you or a loved one experienced serious side effects or death while taking Actiq, contact us today to find out if you may have a personal injury claim.

  • Testosterone is a male sex hormone that naturally decreases in the body as a man ages. This dip in testosterone levels can cause symptoms such as such as fatigue, depression, low libido, decreased muscle mass, and increased body fat.

    In recent years, millions of American men have been prescribed testosterone replacement drugs to combat these typical signs of aging. In fact, the companies that make these “Low-T” drugs use aggressive marketing to encourage patients and doctors to continue using these products that can sometimes have dangerous side effects.

  • Thousands of American women have undergone surgery for the insertion of products known as transvaginal mesh or surgical mesh implants. This surgical procedure is done, typically in older women, to correct for the effects of pelvic organ prolapse, when the internal body structure requires additional support to prevent the sagging of organs such as the urethra, cervix, and rectum. Transvaginal mesh is intended to repair this issue and ensure fewer health problems going forward.

  • Trasylol (aprotinin) is a drug that was widely used in surgery to help reduce bleeding. This drug was injected during complex surgery, such as heart and liver surgery, with the main effect of the slowing down of fibrinolysis, the process by which blood clots break down. The goal was to reduce the need for blood transfusions and organ damage due to hypotension.

  • Viagra and the related drug Revatio (sildenafil), both formulated and sold by the drug company Pfizer, are used to treat erectile dysfunction (ED) and pulmonary hypertension. Millions of men have utilized these medications to remedy these conditions and improve their day-to-day quality of life.

  • Vioxx (rofecoxib) is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that was prescribed and marketed for osteoarthritis, acute pain, and dysmenorrhea. Throughout its time on the market, millions of people around the world were prescribed this medication.

  • Voltaren (diclofenac) is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug used for reducing inflammation and relieving pain. It is used to treat primarily acute pain, inflammatory disorders, and dysmenorrhea.

    Following the news that Vioxx carries a markedly high risk of cardiovascular incidents and heart disease, all other NSAIDs came under scrutiny as well. While Vioxx was pulled from the market, Voltaren and many other NSAIDs continue to be sold and prescribed. However, it may be that Volatern carries as high a risk of heart attack or stroke as Vioxx.

  • Xarelto is a blood-thinning drug which is used to reduce the risk of blood clots and stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation or “AFib” (irregular heartbeat) or patients who are recovering from certain surgical operations.

  • Zofran (ondansetron) and its dissolvable sister drug Zuplenz are drugs originally developed to treat nausea in cancer patients. GlaxoSmithKline, the drug company responsible for Zofran, in an effort to capitalize on another segment of the market, encouraged the prescription of this medication for nausea in pregnant women.

  • Zoloft (sertraline) is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant that is widely prescribed in the United States. As of 2013, over 40 million Americans were prescribed Zoloft. It is primarily prescribed for major depressive disorder but can also be used for treating obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), panic disorder, and social anxiety disorder, in both adults and children.

  • Zyprexa (olanzapine) is an atypical antipsychotic approved in the United States for the treatment of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. It is also prescribed by some doctors for off-label uses, with no documented proof of effectiveness.

    Some patients claim that Eli Lilly, the manufacturer of Zyprexa, did not properly warn patients about the potential side effects that can occur while taking this medication. It has been alleged that Zyprexa can actually cause diabetes and other illnesses. At the very least it appears that the drug can lead to non-trivial hyperglycemia in patients that already have diabetes.